• Accelerating the application of stem cell technology in human disease

    The campus recently announced the launch of a major new collaborative initiative centred around the use of stem cell technology in research, diagnostics and therapeutics at an event held at the Bangalore Life Science Cluster campus.

  • Karl Deisseroth visits NCBS

    Karl Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University visited the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, while he was in the city as the featured speaker for the Cell Press-TNQ India Distinguished Lectureship Series 2016.

  • NCBS Annual Talks 2016 – Photostory

    The National Centre for Biological Sciences held its much-awaited yearly event, the Annual Talks from 11th to 13th January this year.

  • NCBS Annual Talks 2016 – Coming of age: Transitions in biological systems

    The NCBS Annual talks for 2016 will be held from 11th to13th January. A full schedule for the presentations this year can be found here.

  • Satyajit Mayor’s lab star in the latest ‘Microscopic blockbuster’

    This year, Dr. Satyajit Mayor's team from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, was selected by the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) to star in a Celldance video that features their work on cell membrane organisation. Celldance Studios (ASCB's Public information Committee) invited Dr. Mayor's lab to send them a rough-cut video highlighting their work.

  • Science on tracks: NCBS and the Science Express

    A science exhibition on the move? It's a fantastic idea that has been travelling on the Indian railway tracks for seven years. The Science Express is a unique moving science exhibition mounted on a 16-coach AC train that was first flagged off in 2007 by the then Prime Minister of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh and German Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel.

  • Sniff and track or run and scan?

    It's dinnertime, and the smell of delicious food makes your tummy rumble. However, it's dark because of a powercut and you can't see very clearly. What do you do? Raise your head, sniff, and follow the delectable smells to where the food is? Or should you just take a guess and peek into the kitchen, or the dining room or the veranda, which are the likeliest places for dinner to be served? A recent study shows that the latter method - dubbed "run-and-scan" - may actually be a more efficient way to find your target than just following your nose.

  • Contact, connect and fuse: An ultra-structural view of the muscle formation process

    For an avid exerciser, a muscle pull or tear is a painful and fairly common occurrence. A sudden turn or an unusually vigorous bout of aerobics can leave one with a muscle tear that will effectively confine a person to bed for a few weeks. However, muscles do heal - a set of quiescent cells called myosatellite cells in muscles are activated by injury to divide and form myoblasts, which in turn fuse with muscle cells to repair damaged muscles.

  • Butterfly mimicry through the eyes of bird predators

    Mimicry: the art or practice of imitating something.

  • Mysteries of misfolding: how does the prion protein misfold?

    Prions are strange, even by the standards of the biological world which regularly throws up bizarre creations. They are the agents that cause mad cow disease in cattle, scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease (the equivalent of mad-cow in humans) and fatal familial insomnia. The term prion was coined from the words “protein” and “infection” to reflect its unique nature – an infectious protein, which does not require the all-important DNA or RNA molecules to copy and transmit biological information.

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